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ENVIRONMENTS OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS UNDER THE YOUNG SUN: SEEDS OF BIOMOLECULES

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
April 9-13, 2018

Science Program

Group Photo
Recording of symposium using Adobe Connect

Day 1: Monday, April 9, 2018 - Space Weather from The Young Sun and Active Stars
Building 34, Room W150

Session Chair: Nat Gopalswamy (GSFC)
9:00
- 9:30 am
Opening talks by V. Airapetian (GSFC/SEEC & AU), James Green (HQ), Colleen Hartman (GSFC), Avi Mandell (GSFC/SEEC) and Phil Johnson (American University)
9:30
- 10:00 am
10:00
- 10:30 am
Yosuke Yamashiki (University of Kyoto, Japan)
Martian Surface Environmental Assessment during Young Sun
10:30
- 10:45 am
Coffee Break
10:45
- 11:15
Nat Gopalswamy (GSFC, USA)
Extreme CMEs and Energetic Particles from the Sun (Invited)
11:15
- 11:45 pm
11:45
- 12:45 pm
Breakout Session: From the Sun to Active Stars (Part 1)
12:45
- 2:00 pm
Lunch
2:00
- 2:30 pm
Vladimir Airapetian (GSFC/SEEC & AU, USA)
Evolving Space Weather from The Young Sun
3:00
- 3:30 pm
3:30
- 3:45 pm
Coffee break
3:45
- 4:15 pm
4:15
- 4:45 pm
4:45
- 5:45 pm
Breakout Session: From the Sun to Active Stars (Part 2)
5:45
- 7:00 pm
Lightning Talks (2 min per poster presentation) followed by the Poster Session
Day 2: Tuesday, April 10, 2018 – Impact of Space Weather from the Young Sun
Building 34, Room W150

Session Chair: Manuel Güdel (University of Vienna)
8:30
- 9:00 am
Colin Johnstone (University of Vienna, Austria)
The Upper Atmosphere of The Early Earth: Physical Properties and Mass Loss (Invited)
9:00
- 9:30 am
Kazunari Shibata (Kyoto University, Japan)
Superflares on Solar Type Stars (Invited)
9:30
- 10:00 am
Janet Luhman (UC Berkeley, USA) & Shannon Curry (UC Berkeley, USA)
Implications of SEP Event and CIR Observations on the Effects of the Young Sun on Mars (Invited)
10:00
- 10:20 am
Coffee Break
10:20
- 10:50 am
11:20
- 11:50 am
11:50
- 12:30 pm
Breakout Session
12:30
- 1:30 pm
Lunch
1:30
- 2:00 pm
Robert Strangeway (UCLA, USA)
Ionospheric Outflows from Earth (Invited) – remote presentation via Adobe Connect
2:00
- 2:30 pm
Hiroyuki Kurokawa (Tokyo Tech/ELSI, Japan)
Isotopic constraints on the loss of atmosphere and water from Mars
2:30
- 3:00 pm
Nita Sahai (University of Akron, USA)
Geochemical Controls on Protocell Self-Assembly in the Origins of Life
3:00
- 3:20 pm
Coffee Break
4:20
- 4:20 pm
Coffee Break
5:00
- 5:45 pm
Breakout Session
5:45
- 7:00 pm
Poster Session
Day 3: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - Climates of Early Earth, Mars and Venus
Building 34, Room W150

Session Chair: Vladimir Airapetian (GSFC/SEEC)
8:30
- 9:00 am
9:00
- 9:30 am
Jim Cleaves (ELSI/Tokyo Tech, Japan)
A Systems Model of Earth’s Early Abiotic Nitrogen Cycle (Invited)
9:30
- 10:00 am
Michael Way (GISS, USA)
Modeling Venus Through Time its Implications for the Habitability of Venus-like exoplanetary worlds – remote presentation via Adobe Connect
10:00
- 10:30 am
Kristina Kislyakova (University of Vienna, Austria)
On the evolution of the early atmosphere of Venus
10:30
- 10:45 am
Coffee Break
10:45
- 11:15 am
Athanasia Nikolaou (DLR, Germany)
Terrestrial magma ocean evolution: Building an atmosphere under the young Sun
11:45
- 12:15 pm
Sukrit Ranjan (MIT, USA), Dimitar Sasselov (Harvard University, USA)
UV light on Earth and on M-dwarf Exoplanets: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry (Invited)
12:15
- 1:00 pm
Breakout Session
1:00
- 2:00 pm
Lunch
2:00
- 2:15 pm
Group Photo
2:15
- 7:00 pm
Tour to Washington, DC-Cherry Blossom Festival
Day 4: Thursday, April 12, 2018 - Building Blocks of Life
Building 33, Room H114

Session Chair: Jim Cleaves (Tokyo Institute of Technology, ELSI, Japan)
8:30
- 9:00 am
9:00
- 9:30 am
Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy (Scripps Institute, USA)
Understanding the Pathways of Emergence of Complexity In Prebiotic and Biological Chemistry (Invited)
9:30
- 10:00 am
Robert Pascal (University of Montpellier, France)
Are there environmental requirements for biological organization to emerge? (Invited)
10:00
- 10:30 am
Laurie Barge (JPL, USA)
Exploring Environmental Conditions for Prebiotic Chemistry on Early Terrestrial Planets (Invited)
10:30
- 10:45 am
Coffee break
10:45
- 11:15 am
11:15
- 11:45 am
11:45
- 12:30 pm
Breakout Session
12:30
- 1:30 pm
Lunch
1:30
- 2:00 pm
Gang Li (University of Alabama at Huntsville, USA)
SEPs from the Young Sun
2:00
- 2:30 pm
Zita Martins (Instituto Superior Téchnico, Portugal)
The origin and evolution of organic matter in the solar system: from interstellar ices to primitive carbonaceous chondrite (Invited)
2:30
- 3:00 pm
Shigenori Maruyama (Tokyo Institute of Technology/ELSI, Japan)
Nine requirements for the birthplace of life and probability of life beyond Earth
3:00
- 3:15 pm
Coffee break
3:45
- 4:15 pm
Albert Fahrenbach (Tokyo Institute of Technology/ELSI, Japan)
Radiolytic Synthesis of RNA Precursors
4:15
- 4:30 pm
Coffee break
4:30
- 5:00 pm
Michael Mumma (GSFC/SEEC)
A Compositional Survey of 30 Comets: Chemical and Isotopic Signatures, and Implications for Enabling Life’s Origins in Planetary Systems
5:00
- 5:30 pm
Jan Spitzer (Mallard Creek Polymers, USA)
Emergence of Life on Earth-like Planets
5:30
- 6:30 pm
Breakout session
7:00
- 11:00 pm
Banquet at Recreation Center, GSFC
Day 5:
Friday, April 13, 2018 – Biogenic Conditions on Early Terrestrial Planets and Exoplanets

Building 33, Room H114

Session Chair: Nick Hud (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)

9:00
- 9:30 am
Charley Lineweaver (Australian National University, Australia)
Atmospheres, Weathering, Circumstellar Habitable Zones and the Gaian Bottleneck Model (Invited)
9:30
- 10:00 am
Moran Frenkel Pinter (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)
Dynamic Polymerization of Prebiotic Depsipeptides Allows Selection of Stable Structures
10:00
- 10:30 am
10:30
- 10:45 am
Coffee break
10:45
- 11:15 am
Maurice van Putten (Sejong University, South Korea)
Moons as a proxy for global clement climate in exoplanets
11:15
- 11:40 am
Shawn Domagal-Goldman (GSFC/SEEC, USA)
LUVOIR: A Mission to "Early Earth 2.0"
11:45
- 12:15 pm
12:15
- 1:15 pm
Concluding Remarks by Vladimir Airapetian (GSFC/SEEC and AU, USA)
Biogenic Conditions on the Early Earth and Mars Under The Young Sun: What Do We Learn?
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