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Blog: Was Washington DC really in a flash drought?

07.19.2018
Members of the Hydrological Sciences Laboratory recently published a blog post as a a written response to a Capital Weather Gang article identifying the early July dry spell in the DC region as a flash drought. The post provides the definition of a flash drought as defined in recent publications, and includes figures from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and the U.S. Drought Monitor to show that the region had not quite entered into drought conditions before the rain over the last week.

Blog: Making a map of water and ice

05.17.2018
Hydrologist Matt Rodell at NASA's Goddard Spaceflight Center has been living with first-of-its-kind data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for 16 years. That data shows big changes of mass in specific spots on Earth, primarily the result of the movement of water and ice, but it doesn’t tell them what causes those changes. That's where Matt and the GRACE team come in, painstakingly connecting these observed changes to the loss of ice sheets, depleting aquifers, and climate change. It's a problem they're still working on, getting closer every day. Matt explains the years-long process in his own words.

Landslide Viewer displayed at GIS Conference Map Gallery

03.20.2018
The GIS web application Landslide Viewer, which was developed by Caroline Juang (617/SSAI), Dalia Kirschbaum (617), Thomas Stanley (617/USRA), and Jim Shute (606.2/CSC), and which maps landslide event data from the Global Landslide Catalog (GLC), was displayed in the 2018 Esri Federal GIS Conference’s Map Gallery, in Washington, DC, March 20-21.
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Overview

The Hydrological Sciences Laboratory examines the role of water in the Earth system. Laboratory researchers strive to better understand, quantify, and analyze the hydrological cycle and to measure hydrological processes in order to improve prediction of the response of global hydrology to anthropogenic and/or natural climate change.

Special emphasis is placed on land surface hydrological processes and their interactions with the atmosphere. Laboratory scientists develop remote-sensing and modeling techniques to investigate how the various components of the hydrological cycle interact over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales.

For further information, data, research, and other resources, see Hydrological Sciences Research.


Contact Us

Matthew Rodell
301.286.9143
matthew.rodell@nasa.gov

General inquiries about the scientific programs at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center may be directed to the Center Office of Communications at 1.301.286.8955.

                                                                                                                                                                                        
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